Webinar: Subacromial Pain Syndrome & Tennis Elbow

Webinar: Subacromial Pain Syndrome & Tennis Elbow

Date and time

Monday 11th July

19:00 - 21:00

Speaker

Rupen Dattani

Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon

Location

Webinar

Price

£29 + VAT

Buy now

Add to basket

Webinar: Subacromial Pain Syndrome & Tennis Elbow

This event is available to purchase on-demand and was first delivered on 11th July 2022. Once you've purchased the course, you can watch it immediately from your Oryon Develop dashboard by logging into your account.


Put your shoulder to the wheel and get some quality CPD under your belt!


Shoulder pain can lead to lost workdays and disability. The most common cause of shoulder pain is subacromial pain syndrome, which for the vast majority of patients can be treated in primary health care.


Tennis elbow is the most common cause of elbow pain and dysfunction. It often happens after overuse or repeated action of the muscles of the forearm, near the elbow joint. Most patients are treated non-operatively in primary care.


Join us and Mr Rupen Dattani, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, to examine the causes of subacromial pain and tennis elbow. We will be discussing the pathophysiology of these conditions and the novel techniques used in their treatment.


Learn about these upper limb conditions in our latest webinar.

In the first half of the evening, we will be focusing on subacromial pain, evaluating the latest theories on the development of this condition as well as, novel methods for treating this disorder.


In the second half, we will be exploring the emerging evidence on tennis elbow and the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management. We will shed light on the understanding and treatment for healthcare professionals.


Throughout the webinar, Mr Dattani will be analysing the evidence currently available for non-surgical management including biological treatments such as Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP).


Stand shoulder to shoulder (virtually) with your peers and get 2-hours of group learning CPD!


Schedule: 

Part 1 - Subacromial pain syndrome: 

  • Latest theories on the development
  • Novel techniques used for treatment

Part 2 - Tennis Elbow:

  • Emerging evidence
  • Development, diagnosis and management 
  • Understandings and treatment for healthcare professionals


Learning Outcomes:

  • Causes of subacromial pain syndrome and tennis elbow
  • Novel methods for treating subacromial pain
  • Diagnosis and management for tennis elbow
  • Treatment options used on tennis elbow, for healthcare professionals

Rupen Dattani

Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon | London

Mr Rupen Dattani has completed two prestigious fellowships in shoulder and elbow surgery, one working with Mr Graham Tytherleigh-Strong in Cambridge and the other at the internationally renowned Reading Shoulder Unit working with Professor Ofer Levy.

Mr Dattani has also completed a trauma fellowship at a Level I trauma centre in Vancouver, Canada. These fellowships have provided him with a highly specialised clinical practice, exclusively in shoulder and elbow arthroscopic and arthroplasty surgery as well as surgery for fractures around the shoulder and elbow joints.


Mr Dattani has always had a strong research ethic and believes that the high quality of medical care we enjoy today has only been achieved through well controlled research. He has published over 20 articles in peer-reviewed journals and has presented his work at both national and international conferences. His main research interests are in assessing patient outcomes following shoulder surgery.

2 hour webinar, speaker's slides (if permitted) and CPD certificate

Chiropractors, Osteopaths, Physiotherapists, Sports Therapists, Radiographers, Occupational Therapists, GP, Other Health Professionals, Trainee Health Professionals, Students

Webinar: Subacromial Pain Syndrome & Tennis Elbow

Buy now

Add to basket

Date and time

Monday 11th July

19:00 - 21:00

Price

£29 + VAT

Speaker

Rupen Dattani

Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon

Location

Webinar

Oryon Develop Student Discount

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